Presentation Title

Prescription Stimulant Diversion: Contexts in Which Diversion Occurs (Preliminary Findings)

Faculty Mentor

Niloofar Bavarian

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

26

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Diversion fosters prescription stimulant misuse because it increases availability and access to stimulants. As such, our study aims to apply qualitative methods to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the context behind diversion behaviors (where, when, why and how these behaviors occur). A total of 16 peer-led and semi-structured interviews were conducted with diverters at one southern California university. Within the 16 interviews, 11 interviews were with former diverters (those who have diverted more than 30 days prior to their interview) and 5 interviews were with current diverters (those who have diverted within 30 days prior to their interview). These interviews were face-to-face and ranged from 44 to 120 minutes; during each interview, open-ended questions were asked to better understand the contexts in which diversion occurs. Interview audio files were transcribed and verified for inductive, qualitative analysis. To date, our interviews have been open coded to identify preliminary themes. Contextual codes were classified and identified based on who they shared with (who), location (where), period (when), reason (why), and method (how) of diversion. Of the 16 interviewees, a majority of the participants reported diverting with friends and siblings (who). Diversion commonly occurred at on-campus locations (e.g. library (where)) and off-campus locations (e.g. music festival). These incidences often occurred during school sessions (e.g. finals (when)). Recurring reasons that appeared for diversion include having excess pills and to help the recipient study (why). Most communication exchanges between the diverter and recipient occurred in-person (how). Currently, we are in the process of axial coding, codebook development, and finalizing themes. The preliminary themes gathered from interviews can be utilized to distinguish contexts in which diversion behaviors exist. Developing a contextual understanding of diversion may facilitate policy-based prevention efforts to reduce prescription stimulant misuse and diversion among college campuses.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Prescription Stimulant Diversion: Contexts in Which Diversion Occurs (Preliminary Findings)

26

Diversion fosters prescription stimulant misuse because it increases availability and access to stimulants. As such, our study aims to apply qualitative methods to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the context behind diversion behaviors (where, when, why and how these behaviors occur). A total of 16 peer-led and semi-structured interviews were conducted with diverters at one southern California university. Within the 16 interviews, 11 interviews were with former diverters (those who have diverted more than 30 days prior to their interview) and 5 interviews were with current diverters (those who have diverted within 30 days prior to their interview). These interviews were face-to-face and ranged from 44 to 120 minutes; during each interview, open-ended questions were asked to better understand the contexts in which diversion occurs. Interview audio files were transcribed and verified for inductive, qualitative analysis. To date, our interviews have been open coded to identify preliminary themes. Contextual codes were classified and identified based on who they shared with (who), location (where), period (when), reason (why), and method (how) of diversion. Of the 16 interviewees, a majority of the participants reported diverting with friends and siblings (who). Diversion commonly occurred at on-campus locations (e.g. library (where)) and off-campus locations (e.g. music festival). These incidences often occurred during school sessions (e.g. finals (when)). Recurring reasons that appeared for diversion include having excess pills and to help the recipient study (why). Most communication exchanges between the diverter and recipient occurred in-person (how). Currently, we are in the process of axial coding, codebook development, and finalizing themes. The preliminary themes gathered from interviews can be utilized to distinguish contexts in which diversion behaviors exist. Developing a contextual understanding of diversion may facilitate policy-based prevention efforts to reduce prescription stimulant misuse and diversion among college campuses.