Presentation Title

Water Clock

Presenter Information

Kelin ChaiFollow

Faculty Mentor

Lucy HG Solomon

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:44 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:29 AM

Location

270

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

creative_arts_design

Abstract

For my project idea, I was inspired by the historical measurement of time. Nowadays, technology is developing rapidly. It is very simple: we want to know the time. If you look at the mobile phone, you can use the digital clock to see what time it is. This actually makes us ignore how time is expressed. Historically, water was used to monitor time, and people created water clocks. Therefore, I designed a simple water clock model with materials that are easily available around me or recyclable items. Without electronics, we can still tell time. I have made a water clock based on research into physical properties of water, mechanics and through experimentation. In order to create the water clock, I first researched buoyancy and gear rotation. Chris Woodford’s text, “Pendulum Clocks,” (2018) details the movement and principles of the pendulum clock, detailing the role and importance of the gear. Based on this research, I decided to use gears to transmit power in my water clock. I generate buoyancy with water and use the water level to express time. As Rhett Allain writes in his article in Wired (“You, Too, Can Have Superpowers—Just Hop in a Swimming Pool” 2018): “...this is a force that every object in water or even in the air has pushing up on it.” The presence of buoyancy powers the gears, pushing them to move the clock, showing the time. I also referenced Mary Ellen Ellis’ article, “Intravenous Fluid Regulation” in Healthline (2016) and was inspired to use an IV administration set to control the clock’s speed.

This design is linked to ancient inventions. At a moment in society’s development when it is easy to know the time with a digital device, I think this kind of process-based invention can stimulate more feelings and reflections about the passage of time. It can also help people to understand and use knowledge about physics in real life. I think that it is possible for kids and teens to become inspired and to improve their creativity when they start learning through experimenting.

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Nov 23rd, 10:44 AM Nov 23rd, 11:29 AM

Water Clock

270

For my project idea, I was inspired by the historical measurement of time. Nowadays, technology is developing rapidly. It is very simple: we want to know the time. If you look at the mobile phone, you can use the digital clock to see what time it is. This actually makes us ignore how time is expressed. Historically, water was used to monitor time, and people created water clocks. Therefore, I designed a simple water clock model with materials that are easily available around me or recyclable items. Without electronics, we can still tell time. I have made a water clock based on research into physical properties of water, mechanics and through experimentation. In order to create the water clock, I first researched buoyancy and gear rotation. Chris Woodford’s text, “Pendulum Clocks,” (2018) details the movement and principles of the pendulum clock, detailing the role and importance of the gear. Based on this research, I decided to use gears to transmit power in my water clock. I generate buoyancy with water and use the water level to express time. As Rhett Allain writes in his article in Wired (“You, Too, Can Have Superpowers—Just Hop in a Swimming Pool” 2018): “...this is a force that every object in water or even in the air has pushing up on it.” The presence of buoyancy powers the gears, pushing them to move the clock, showing the time. I also referenced Mary Ellen Ellis’ article, “Intravenous Fluid Regulation” in Healthline (2016) and was inspired to use an IV administration set to control the clock’s speed.

This design is linked to ancient inventions. At a moment in society’s development when it is easy to know the time with a digital device, I think this kind of process-based invention can stimulate more feelings and reflections about the passage of time. It can also help people to understand and use knowledge about physics in real life. I think that it is possible for kids and teens to become inspired and to improve their creativity when they start learning through experimenting.