Presentation Title

Imposter Syndrome among undergraduate college students: The link between competitive culture and self-doubt

Faculty Mentor

Bayley Ambrose, Kristine Gopez, Simon Tran

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

28

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Imposter syndrome is a feeling of inadequacy of success and fraud through various accomplishments. It is the extension of insecurities, self-doubt, and anxiety over achievements that are perceived as undeserving. These side effects primarily affect many college students whose drive is to achieve perfectionism both academically and socially. In this study, participants are among various universities such as UC Berkeley, Cal State Fullerton, and Higher School of Economics in Russia with different courses of study. Additional evidence found in psychological studies and statistical data proves many students’ experience an inability to internalize and accept one’s status and success. “Results support the unique importance of perfectionistic self-presentation in predicting academic problems in graduate students and highlight the need for continued research in this area” (Cowie). This research dissects the link between academia and college students, where students have imposter syndrome through the competitive culture that each institution places. Their accomplishments, such as their college acceptance at a prestigious institution, is perceived as fraudulent as though they conned their way to that achievement. It results in depression, anxiety, and immobility to one’s future success; therefore, becoming aware of the phenomenon will reduce these symptoms caused by imposter syndrome. The spread of this awareness will help those who are unaware of this toxic strive for perfectionism, by allowing students to appreciate how hard they work, rather than dwell on what they could have done better. As a result, college students will accept their achievements as well-deserved while also improving their mental health status.

Keywords: imposter syndrome, college students, perfectionism, fraudulent, future success, academics

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Imposter Syndrome among undergraduate college students: The link between competitive culture and self-doubt

28

Imposter syndrome is a feeling of inadequacy of success and fraud through various accomplishments. It is the extension of insecurities, self-doubt, and anxiety over achievements that are perceived as undeserving. These side effects primarily affect many college students whose drive is to achieve perfectionism both academically and socially. In this study, participants are among various universities such as UC Berkeley, Cal State Fullerton, and Higher School of Economics in Russia with different courses of study. Additional evidence found in psychological studies and statistical data proves many students’ experience an inability to internalize and accept one’s status and success. “Results support the unique importance of perfectionistic self-presentation in predicting academic problems in graduate students and highlight the need for continued research in this area” (Cowie). This research dissects the link between academia and college students, where students have imposter syndrome through the competitive culture that each institution places. Their accomplishments, such as their college acceptance at a prestigious institution, is perceived as fraudulent as though they conned their way to that achievement. It results in depression, anxiety, and immobility to one’s future success; therefore, becoming aware of the phenomenon will reduce these symptoms caused by imposter syndrome. The spread of this awareness will help those who are unaware of this toxic strive for perfectionism, by allowing students to appreciate how hard they work, rather than dwell on what they could have done better. As a result, college students will accept their achievements as well-deserved while also improving their mental health status.

Keywords: imposter syndrome, college students, perfectionism, fraudulent, future success, academics