Presentation Title

Adult Children’s Legitimacy of Intervention into Aging Parents’ Autonomy

Faculty Mentor

Noriko Toyokawa

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

30

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Background:Research on adolescent-parent adaptation between adolescents’ autonomy and parents’ authority shows that adolescents accept parental authority in moral (i.e., issues that involve other peoples’ safety), prudential (i.e., issues that involve their own health and safety), and conventional issues (i.e., issues of manners, customs, norms). Conversely, they believe they can be autonomous in personal issues (i.e., issues that do not involve other people). Consequently, ambivalent emotions toward parents (i.e., mixed emotions of love and hate) often occurs around the legitimacy of parental authority in adolescents’ personal issues. Ambivalent emotions structure the relationships between aging parents and their children and can be influenced by legitimizing intervention decisions made by adult children. Objective:The current study applied the framework utilized in research on adolescents’ perception of legitimacy of parental authority for adult children’s legitimacy of intervention into their aging parents’ autonomy. Method:Participants were 346 middle-aged adults who had at least one living parent (Mage= 60. 05, SD= 7.86). The data for this study were drawn from the mentor’s online research survey data set. Result:Adult children’s perceptions that they were in control parents’ moral (ex. impaired driving) and prudential issues (ex. taking medication properly, checking bank account) were not significantly associated with their ambivalent emotions. Participants’ perceptions of their control of parents’ personal issues (ex. dating, faith, which children parents trust most) were positively associated with greater levels of ambivalent emotions. Discussion:The findings suggest that participants could comfortably legitimate their intervention into their aging parents’ autonomy in parents’ moral and prudential issues. However, they feel less comfortable to override parents’ autonomy in parents’ personal issues even if they believe it necessary to protect their children. The needs for further studies on the effect of siblings’ involvement in primary caregiver-parent relations and for family-based educational programs to reduce primary caregiver’s ambivalence will be advised. Keywords: intergenerational relations, adult children, caregiving, overriding parental autonomy, ambivalent emotions

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Adult Children’s Legitimacy of Intervention into Aging Parents’ Autonomy

30

Background:Research on adolescent-parent adaptation between adolescents’ autonomy and parents’ authority shows that adolescents accept parental authority in moral (i.e., issues that involve other peoples’ safety), prudential (i.e., issues that involve their own health and safety), and conventional issues (i.e., issues of manners, customs, norms). Conversely, they believe they can be autonomous in personal issues (i.e., issues that do not involve other people). Consequently, ambivalent emotions toward parents (i.e., mixed emotions of love and hate) often occurs around the legitimacy of parental authority in adolescents’ personal issues. Ambivalent emotions structure the relationships between aging parents and their children and can be influenced by legitimizing intervention decisions made by adult children. Objective:The current study applied the framework utilized in research on adolescents’ perception of legitimacy of parental authority for adult children’s legitimacy of intervention into their aging parents’ autonomy. Method:Participants were 346 middle-aged adults who had at least one living parent (Mage= 60. 05, SD= 7.86). The data for this study were drawn from the mentor’s online research survey data set. Result:Adult children’s perceptions that they were in control parents’ moral (ex. impaired driving) and prudential issues (ex. taking medication properly, checking bank account) were not significantly associated with their ambivalent emotions. Participants’ perceptions of their control of parents’ personal issues (ex. dating, faith, which children parents trust most) were positively associated with greater levels of ambivalent emotions. Discussion:The findings suggest that participants could comfortably legitimate their intervention into their aging parents’ autonomy in parents’ moral and prudential issues. However, they feel less comfortable to override parents’ autonomy in parents’ personal issues even if they believe it necessary to protect their children. The needs for further studies on the effect of siblings’ involvement in primary caregiver-parent relations and for family-based educational programs to reduce primary caregiver’s ambivalence will be advised. Keywords: intergenerational relations, adult children, caregiving, overriding parental autonomy, ambivalent emotions