Presentation Title

The Significance of Disaggregated Data for Studying the Outcomes of Young Latino Males

Faculty Mentor

Luis Sanchez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

34

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Previous research on Latino males in the United States suggests they exhibit relatively low levels of academic and economic achievement (McConell, 2015 and Zarate & Burciaga, 2010). Many studies on Latino males utilize aggregate national or state-level data that incorporates both foreign and U.S.-born respondents. However, this practice might mask nativity differences in social and economic outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to analyze disaggregated data and examine nativity differences between immigrant and U.S.-born Latino males in California. I utilize individual-level data from the 2013-2017 American Community Survey (5-year estimates) to study a sample of California Latino young adults (ages 25 to 34) and examine nativity differences in educational, economic, and marital outcomes. I compare findings from my sample to the overall, aggregate data for Latino males of all ages living in California. For example, the aggregate data for all ages show that 38.6% of Latino males in California have less than high school degree. However, my findings demonstrate that only 12.7% of young adult Latino males have less than a high school degree. Among this sample, only 8% of U.S.-born Latino males have less than a high school degree. The importance of this research is to show the importance of disaggregating data and not conflating the experiences of Latino males of different ages and migration experiences. Although the educational attainment of contemporary Latino males in California still lags behind other groups, these disaggregated findings might shed new light on recent trends in Latino males' educational progress.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The Significance of Disaggregated Data for Studying the Outcomes of Young Latino Males

34

Previous research on Latino males in the United States suggests they exhibit relatively low levels of academic and economic achievement (McConell, 2015 and Zarate & Burciaga, 2010). Many studies on Latino males utilize aggregate national or state-level data that incorporates both foreign and U.S.-born respondents. However, this practice might mask nativity differences in social and economic outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to analyze disaggregated data and examine nativity differences between immigrant and U.S.-born Latino males in California. I utilize individual-level data from the 2013-2017 American Community Survey (5-year estimates) to study a sample of California Latino young adults (ages 25 to 34) and examine nativity differences in educational, economic, and marital outcomes. I compare findings from my sample to the overall, aggregate data for Latino males of all ages living in California. For example, the aggregate data for all ages show that 38.6% of Latino males in California have less than high school degree. However, my findings demonstrate that only 12.7% of young adult Latino males have less than a high school degree. Among this sample, only 8% of U.S.-born Latino males have less than a high school degree. The importance of this research is to show the importance of disaggregating data and not conflating the experiences of Latino males of different ages and migration experiences. Although the educational attainment of contemporary Latino males in California still lags behind other groups, these disaggregated findings might shed new light on recent trends in Latino males' educational progress.