Presentation Title

Effects of hypocretin receptor 1 antagonism on maternal behavior in primiparous and multiparous dams

Presenter Information

Ivan PerezFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. D'Anna- Hernandez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

36

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Postpartum depression in lactating dams is detrimental to maternal care and has been shown to decrease maternal behavior. The underlying neural mechanisms behind postpartum depression are unclear and can be represented using a mouse model. The modulatory neuropeptide Hypocretin (HCRT), may be involved. Hypocretin has 2 receptors, HCRT receptor 1 (HCRTR1) and HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTR2). HCRTR1 specifically regulates behaviors related to maternal behavior such as drug/food seeking, and reward. HCRT neurotransmission is upregulated during lactation and promotes rewarding behaviors such as licking/ grooming of pups. Therefore, HCRTR1 may be involved in the articulation of postpartum depressive symptoms, including a decrease in rewarding behaviors. The present study seeks to elucidate depressive like behaviors and determine if these behaviors are affected by HCRTR1 neurotransmission by antagonizing HCRTR1 and evaluating depressive like behaviors in both primiparous (first time) and multiparous (experienced) dams. On postnatal day 4, lactating dams were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of either a low (10 mg/kg, ip, n=14)or high (20 mg/kg, ip, n= 13)) dose of a Hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist (SB-334867), or a vehicle drug (n=15), to both primiparous and multiparous dams. After 30 minutes, a 6 min tail suspension test (TST) was conducted to measure immobility (depressive like behavior) vs mobility (less depressive like behavior). There were significant differences between parity groups and latency to approach pups between primiparous and multiparous dams (p=.034). These results show that parity differences are prevalent between primiparous and multiparous dams when blocking HCRTR1, thus indicating HCRTR1 may play a role in postpartum depression.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Effects of hypocretin receptor 1 antagonism on maternal behavior in primiparous and multiparous dams

36

Postpartum depression in lactating dams is detrimental to maternal care and has been shown to decrease maternal behavior. The underlying neural mechanisms behind postpartum depression are unclear and can be represented using a mouse model. The modulatory neuropeptide Hypocretin (HCRT), may be involved. Hypocretin has 2 receptors, HCRT receptor 1 (HCRTR1) and HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTR2). HCRTR1 specifically regulates behaviors related to maternal behavior such as drug/food seeking, and reward. HCRT neurotransmission is upregulated during lactation and promotes rewarding behaviors such as licking/ grooming of pups. Therefore, HCRTR1 may be involved in the articulation of postpartum depressive symptoms, including a decrease in rewarding behaviors. The present study seeks to elucidate depressive like behaviors and determine if these behaviors are affected by HCRTR1 neurotransmission by antagonizing HCRTR1 and evaluating depressive like behaviors in both primiparous (first time) and multiparous (experienced) dams. On postnatal day 4, lactating dams were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of either a low (10 mg/kg, ip, n=14)or high (20 mg/kg, ip, n= 13)) dose of a Hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist (SB-334867), or a vehicle drug (n=15), to both primiparous and multiparous dams. After 30 minutes, a 6 min tail suspension test (TST) was conducted to measure immobility (depressive like behavior) vs mobility (less depressive like behavior). There were significant differences between parity groups and latency to approach pups between primiparous and multiparous dams (p=.034). These results show that parity differences are prevalent between primiparous and multiparous dams when blocking HCRTR1, thus indicating HCRTR1 may play a role in postpartum depression.