Presentation Title

The Impact of Bilingual Instruction Training on Increasing Bilingual Teacher Identity​ and Feeling of Preparedness in the Classroom

Faculty Mentor

Anna Woodcock

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

38

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

A quarter of K-12 students in California public schools are Spanish speaking English Learners (ELs). Learning to adapt lessons to a large number of Spanish speaking students requires specialized training. Social Identity theory suggests that strong teacher identity promotes teacher’s effectiveness and persistence (Stryker & Serpe, 1982). Bilingual instruction provides training and effective skills to teach ELs and may also increase bilingual teacher identity. In a four-wave longitudinal study we explored the outcomes of bilingual instruction on Spanish-speaking credential students. The groups were matched on demographics and Spanish-language proficiency. We compared one group of students who were enrolled in supplemental bilingual instruction training (BILA) alongside their credential program (N = 28) and a group of matched-control students (N = 16) who attended a school without a comparable bilingual program. We measured Bilingual Teacher Identity (BTI), Teacher Identity, Teaching Self-Efficacy, EL Teaching Self-Efficacy, and feelings of preparedness upon finishing the credential program. Both groups had similar teaching skills and efficacy scores upon entering the program and into their first year of teaching. However, the BILA group had a significantly higher BTI than the control group (t (12.28) = 2.82, p = .015, d = 1.143) and felt more prepared to teach after finishing the program than the control group (t (19.91) = 2.02, p =.057, d = .702). This highlights the importance of bilingual instruction, as it may help prepare credential students effectively teach English Learners.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The Impact of Bilingual Instruction Training on Increasing Bilingual Teacher Identity​ and Feeling of Preparedness in the Classroom

38

A quarter of K-12 students in California public schools are Spanish speaking English Learners (ELs). Learning to adapt lessons to a large number of Spanish speaking students requires specialized training. Social Identity theory suggests that strong teacher identity promotes teacher’s effectiveness and persistence (Stryker & Serpe, 1982). Bilingual instruction provides training and effective skills to teach ELs and may also increase bilingual teacher identity. In a four-wave longitudinal study we explored the outcomes of bilingual instruction on Spanish-speaking credential students. The groups were matched on demographics and Spanish-language proficiency. We compared one group of students who were enrolled in supplemental bilingual instruction training (BILA) alongside their credential program (N = 28) and a group of matched-control students (N = 16) who attended a school without a comparable bilingual program. We measured Bilingual Teacher Identity (BTI), Teacher Identity, Teaching Self-Efficacy, EL Teaching Self-Efficacy, and feelings of preparedness upon finishing the credential program. Both groups had similar teaching skills and efficacy scores upon entering the program and into their first year of teaching. However, the BILA group had a significantly higher BTI than the control group (t (12.28) = 2.82, p = .015, d = 1.143) and felt more prepared to teach after finishing the program than the control group (t (19.91) = 2.02, p =.057, d = .702). This highlights the importance of bilingual instruction, as it may help prepare credential students effectively teach English Learners.