Presentation Title

Ethnic Differences in Subjective and Objective Measures of Emotion Regulation

Faculty Mentor

Araceli Gonzalez

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

4

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Emotion regulation is the process whereby an individual modifies their emotional reactions depending on what is acceptable in their environment. Ethnic differences in cultural values may lead to differences in emotion regulation strategies. Prior research has demonstrated that physiological response in emotion regulation may also differ across cultures. Research that examines both subjective (self-report) and objective (physiological response) measures of emotion regulation is scarce. The present study sought to examine potential ethnic differences in subjective and objective emotion regulation strategies between Asian, Latinx, and Non-Hispanic White young adults. It was hypothesized that Asian and Latinx participants will display higher emotion regulation difficulties compared to non-Hispanic White individuals. Participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), a self-report measure of difficulties in emotion regulation strategies. Participants also completed the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST), consisting of a speech and math task to elicit a social stress response. To examine objective emotion regulation, three separate physiological measures (cortisol level, skin conductance, heart rate variability) were observed across the span of the TSST. Ethnic differences in subjective emotion regulation measure were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. Ethnic differences in objective emotion regulation were analyzed in three separate mixed repeated-measures ANOVAs. Results for subjective emotion regulation showed no significant differences in self-report measures on the DERS between the three ethnic groups (p > .05 for all). Results for objective emotion regulation also did not reveal significant differences in all three physiological measures across the three ethnic groups (p > .05 for all). Although there were no significant differences, this study adds to the limited research comparing emotion regulation across the three ethnic groups of Asian, Latinx, and Non-Hispanic White. Results suggest greater similarities than differences in emotion regulation strategies among this ethnic groups sample. Implications and limitations of this work will be discussed.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Ethnic Differences in Subjective and Objective Measures of Emotion Regulation

4

Emotion regulation is the process whereby an individual modifies their emotional reactions depending on what is acceptable in their environment. Ethnic differences in cultural values may lead to differences in emotion regulation strategies. Prior research has demonstrated that physiological response in emotion regulation may also differ across cultures. Research that examines both subjective (self-report) and objective (physiological response) measures of emotion regulation is scarce. The present study sought to examine potential ethnic differences in subjective and objective emotion regulation strategies between Asian, Latinx, and Non-Hispanic White young adults. It was hypothesized that Asian and Latinx participants will display higher emotion regulation difficulties compared to non-Hispanic White individuals. Participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), a self-report measure of difficulties in emotion regulation strategies. Participants also completed the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST), consisting of a speech and math task to elicit a social stress response. To examine objective emotion regulation, three separate physiological measures (cortisol level, skin conductance, heart rate variability) were observed across the span of the TSST. Ethnic differences in subjective emotion regulation measure were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. Ethnic differences in objective emotion regulation were analyzed in three separate mixed repeated-measures ANOVAs. Results for subjective emotion regulation showed no significant differences in self-report measures on the DERS between the three ethnic groups (p > .05 for all). Results for objective emotion regulation also did not reveal significant differences in all three physiological measures across the three ethnic groups (p > .05 for all). Although there were no significant differences, this study adds to the limited research comparing emotion regulation across the three ethnic groups of Asian, Latinx, and Non-Hispanic White. Results suggest greater similarities than differences in emotion regulation strategies among this ethnic groups sample. Implications and limitations of this work will be discussed.