Presentation Title

CodeQueens: Increasing Identification with Computer Science among High School Girls

Faculty Mentor

Anna Woodcock, Wesley Schultz

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

46

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Despite comprising 9% of the total United States population, Hispanic women make up just 2% of the computer science workforce (National Science Foundation, 2017). Negative stereotypes are one of the many factors that can influence career decisions, and for many young women, these stereotypes discourage the pursuit of computer science. We designed a three-year longitudinal study to assess the effectiveness of an afterschool high school coding club, called CodeQueens, on girls’ interest in pursuing a computer science career. In eight North County San Diego high schools, 248 girls (70% Hispanic) learned coding skills and participated in activities designed to increase their interest in a computer science career, computer science self-efficacy, and computer science identity. Survey data were collected at pre, mid, and post time points during each of the four sessions that occurred during the three-year study. We analyzed computer science identity, self-efficacy, and career interest of the girls that participated in the program. Results varied across each session, with some sessions showing an increase in computer science self-efficacy and career interest. However, we observed a robust increase in computer science identity across each of the program sessions. This study highlights the importance of interventions such as CodeQueens to engage young women, particularly women of color in computer science.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

CodeQueens: Increasing Identification with Computer Science among High School Girls

46

Despite comprising 9% of the total United States population, Hispanic women make up just 2% of the computer science workforce (National Science Foundation, 2017). Negative stereotypes are one of the many factors that can influence career decisions, and for many young women, these stereotypes discourage the pursuit of computer science. We designed a three-year longitudinal study to assess the effectiveness of an afterschool high school coding club, called CodeQueens, on girls’ interest in pursuing a computer science career. In eight North County San Diego high schools, 248 girls (70% Hispanic) learned coding skills and participated in activities designed to increase their interest in a computer science career, computer science self-efficacy, and computer science identity. Survey data were collected at pre, mid, and post time points during each of the four sessions that occurred during the three-year study. We analyzed computer science identity, self-efficacy, and career interest of the girls that participated in the program. Results varied across each session, with some sessions showing an increase in computer science self-efficacy and career interest. However, we observed a robust increase in computer science identity across each of the program sessions. This study highlights the importance of interventions such as CodeQueens to engage young women, particularly women of color in computer science.