Presentation Title

Tetrodotoxin reduction due to antibiotics in the California Newt

Faculty Mentor

Gary Buchareli

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

6

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The California Newt,Taricha torosa, produces a powerful neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin as a method of defense against predators. Many organisms sequester toxins from their diet, but it is unknown how T. torosa produces its toxins. It was theorized that the newts use bacterial recruitment as a method of producing tetrodotoxin. For this experiment we exposed a group of adult and larval T. torosa to antibiotics and took skin swabs and skin samples overtime to quantify the level of tetrodotoxin. We compared these concentrations to control groups that were not exposed to antibiotics. After 3 weeks of treatment our data showed a gradual decrease of tetrodotoxin in the antibiotic group. By the end of the experiment the antibiotic group had a significantly lower concentration of toxin compared to the control group. This infers that the T. torosa at least partially derives its toxins from bacterial recruitment.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Tetrodotoxin reduction due to antibiotics in the California Newt

6

The California Newt,Taricha torosa, produces a powerful neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin as a method of defense against predators. Many organisms sequester toxins from their diet, but it is unknown how T. torosa produces its toxins. It was theorized that the newts use bacterial recruitment as a method of producing tetrodotoxin. For this experiment we exposed a group of adult and larval T. torosa to antibiotics and took skin swabs and skin samples overtime to quantify the level of tetrodotoxin. We compared these concentrations to control groups that were not exposed to antibiotics. After 3 weeks of treatment our data showed a gradual decrease of tetrodotoxin in the antibiotic group. By the end of the experiment the antibiotic group had a significantly lower concentration of toxin compared to the control group. This infers that the T. torosa at least partially derives its toxins from bacterial recruitment.