Presentation Title

Bust A Move: Movement of Microplastics Through Open Water Marine Trophic Levels

Faculty Mentor

William J. Hoese, Jennifer L. Burnaford, Andres Carrillo, Samantha Leigh

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

70

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In the oceans, plastic waste breaks down to smaller particles (microplastics, Artemia salina, would consume microplastics and that these particles could move up the food chain to predatory moon jelly, Aurelia aurita. We provided 12.5mg of 30-90um diameter polypropylene pieces to 12.5mL containing about 1563 Artemia and compared this microplastic ingestion to ingestion of 12.5mg of fish flakes. We monitored the progression of plastic and fish flakes every thirty minutes for 120 minutes. We found no significant differences in consumption or the rate of progression of polypropylene or fish flakes through the gut of brine shrimp. We ran four suspension feeding treatments with jellies (plastic alone, Artemia, Artemia and plastic together, and plastic-fed Artemia) and two gavage treatments (plastic alone and plastic-fed Artemia). Our sample sizes were 2 jellies for the suspension feeding treatment with untreated Artemia and the gavage treatment with plastic-fed Artemia and 4 jellies in the other treatments. We observed jellies twice in a four hour period. Jellies did not eat plastic alone. After two hours we observed plastic in 100% of jellies fed brine shrimp and plastic and 75% after four hours. We observed plastic in 75% of gavage-fed jellies after two hours and 0% after four hours, showing jellies cleared their gut of plastic in four hours. After four hours we observed plastic in 100% of gavage-fed jellies that ate plastic-fed brine shrimp. We demonstrated that plastic can move across trophic levels from brine shrimp to jellies; plastic has the potential to move further up trophic levels in ocean systems. This can potentially cause harm to people through the consumption of plastic-contaminated organisms.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Bust A Move: Movement of Microplastics Through Open Water Marine Trophic Levels

70

In the oceans, plastic waste breaks down to smaller particles (microplastics, Artemia salina, would consume microplastics and that these particles could move up the food chain to predatory moon jelly, Aurelia aurita. We provided 12.5mg of 30-90um diameter polypropylene pieces to 12.5mL containing about 1563 Artemia and compared this microplastic ingestion to ingestion of 12.5mg of fish flakes. We monitored the progression of plastic and fish flakes every thirty minutes for 120 minutes. We found no significant differences in consumption or the rate of progression of polypropylene or fish flakes through the gut of brine shrimp. We ran four suspension feeding treatments with jellies (plastic alone, Artemia, Artemia and plastic together, and plastic-fed Artemia) and two gavage treatments (plastic alone and plastic-fed Artemia). Our sample sizes were 2 jellies for the suspension feeding treatment with untreated Artemia and the gavage treatment with plastic-fed Artemia and 4 jellies in the other treatments. We observed jellies twice in a four hour period. Jellies did not eat plastic alone. After two hours we observed plastic in 100% of jellies fed brine shrimp and plastic and 75% after four hours. We observed plastic in 75% of gavage-fed jellies after two hours and 0% after four hours, showing jellies cleared their gut of plastic in four hours. After four hours we observed plastic in 100% of gavage-fed jellies that ate plastic-fed brine shrimp. We demonstrated that plastic can move across trophic levels from brine shrimp to jellies; plastic has the potential to move further up trophic levels in ocean systems. This can potentially cause harm to people through the consumption of plastic-contaminated organisms.