Presentation Title

Genetic Analysis of Malaysian Scallops Using Mitochondrial (16S & COI) and Nuclear (Histone H3) Genes

Faculty Mentor

Alvin Alejandrino

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

72

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Biodiversity is important to conserve because it helps maintain ecosystems which provide vital services. A service used substantially is for seafood. Scallops in southeast Asia have a high commercial value but suffer from overfishing and are often misidentified for other species. Using shell morphology to identify scallop species has proven to be insufficient due to the effects of convergent evolution which causes near identical shell shape. These factors can lead to accidental biodiversity loss. Due to the commercial importance of scallops in southeast Asia, preventing loss of biodiversity is needed to avert loss of ecosystem services. This study genetically analyzes collected scallops found off the coast of Malaysia. The scallops were identified and assumed to be Amusium pleuronectes through their shell morphology. Molecular evolution is immune to the effects of convergent evolution, therefore, the specimens collected were genetically tested to confirm the species identification. We hypothesize that the collected scallops are Amusium pleuronectes. Mitochondrial genes were used to analyze the specimens at two different levels, within species and on a family level. The mitochondrial genes chosen were 16S and COI. A nuclear gene, histone H3, was also selected to see the relationship of the collected specimens to other bivalves and distantly related organisms. The DNA was extracted from all specimens, amplified through PCR, and then sequenced. The obtained sequences were then edited using Geneious, aligned using ClustalX, and the best fit model of evolution was determined using jModelTest2. Three phylogenies were then reconstructed with the following methods: Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood, and Bayesian Inference. The phylogenies showed that all specimens were grouped together with other Amusium pleuronectes providing confirmation of the original species identification. This supports our hypothesis and helps create a better understanding of biodiversity within the marine ecosystem of southeast Asia preventing any accidental loss of species.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Genetic Analysis of Malaysian Scallops Using Mitochondrial (16S & COI) and Nuclear (Histone H3) Genes

72

Biodiversity is important to conserve because it helps maintain ecosystems which provide vital services. A service used substantially is for seafood. Scallops in southeast Asia have a high commercial value but suffer from overfishing and are often misidentified for other species. Using shell morphology to identify scallop species has proven to be insufficient due to the effects of convergent evolution which causes near identical shell shape. These factors can lead to accidental biodiversity loss. Due to the commercial importance of scallops in southeast Asia, preventing loss of biodiversity is needed to avert loss of ecosystem services. This study genetically analyzes collected scallops found off the coast of Malaysia. The scallops were identified and assumed to be Amusium pleuronectes through their shell morphology. Molecular evolution is immune to the effects of convergent evolution, therefore, the specimens collected were genetically tested to confirm the species identification. We hypothesize that the collected scallops are Amusium pleuronectes. Mitochondrial genes were used to analyze the specimens at two different levels, within species and on a family level. The mitochondrial genes chosen were 16S and COI. A nuclear gene, histone H3, was also selected to see the relationship of the collected specimens to other bivalves and distantly related organisms. The DNA was extracted from all specimens, amplified through PCR, and then sequenced. The obtained sequences were then edited using Geneious, aligned using ClustalX, and the best fit model of evolution was determined using jModelTest2. Three phylogenies were then reconstructed with the following methods: Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood, and Bayesian Inference. The phylogenies showed that all specimens were grouped together with other Amusium pleuronectes providing confirmation of the original species identification. This supports our hypothesis and helps create a better understanding of biodiversity within the marine ecosystem of southeast Asia preventing any accidental loss of species.