Presentation Title

The Effects of Climate Change on Phytoplankton: What to Expect in the Future

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Diane Kim, Dr. Adriane Jones

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

74

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Climate change is affecting the marine ecosystem; the increase of temperature in the ocean affects the growth of microalgae, a primary producer in the marine environment. Microalgae (photosynthetic bacteria and eukaryotic protists) produce >50% of the oxygen for the planet. Other studies have shown that high temperatures can disrupt the growth rate of microalgae. The purpose of this research was to test the growth of a mixture consisting of three different microalgae (Tetraselmis sp., Chaetoceros gracilis, and Isochrysis galbana); grown under two different temperature conditions: 21°C and 24.5°C. The temperatures used simulated the rising global temperatures over a 300-year span, if it does not cease to increase (Laffoley, D. and Baxter, J.M. 2016). At both temperatures, Tetraselmis sp. grew better than the other two species. Although I. galbana had a higher concentration to begin with it decreased while the Tetraselmis sp. grew; C. gracilis had more growth towards the end at 24.5°C. The experiment suggests that Tetraselmis sp. outcompeted the other algae before reaching its plateau stage. It was discovered that all three microalgae plateaued once they reached maximum growth; Tetraselmis sp. was the last one to reach its maximum growth before decreasing. The growth rates suggest that even the most adapted algae, Tetraselmis sp., may be unable to thrive in rising temperatures. Temperature changes may lead to a shift towards organisms better suited for warmer waters and could potentially disrupt the food web.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The Effects of Climate Change on Phytoplankton: What to Expect in the Future

74

Climate change is affecting the marine ecosystem; the increase of temperature in the ocean affects the growth of microalgae, a primary producer in the marine environment. Microalgae (photosynthetic bacteria and eukaryotic protists) produce >50% of the oxygen for the planet. Other studies have shown that high temperatures can disrupt the growth rate of microalgae. The purpose of this research was to test the growth of a mixture consisting of three different microalgae (Tetraselmis sp., Chaetoceros gracilis, and Isochrysis galbana); grown under two different temperature conditions: 21°C and 24.5°C. The temperatures used simulated the rising global temperatures over a 300-year span, if it does not cease to increase (Laffoley, D. and Baxter, J.M. 2016). At both temperatures, Tetraselmis sp. grew better than the other two species. Although I. galbana had a higher concentration to begin with it decreased while the Tetraselmis sp. grew; C. gracilis had more growth towards the end at 24.5°C. The experiment suggests that Tetraselmis sp. outcompeted the other algae before reaching its plateau stage. It was discovered that all three microalgae plateaued once they reached maximum growth; Tetraselmis sp. was the last one to reach its maximum growth before decreasing. The growth rates suggest that even the most adapted algae, Tetraselmis sp., may be unable to thrive in rising temperatures. Temperature changes may lead to a shift towards organisms better suited for warmer waters and could potentially disrupt the food web.