Presentation Title

Recruitment of sessile species to native versus non-native oyster shells in San Diego Bay, CA

Faculty Mentor

Danielle Zacherl

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

80

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Estuaries modified by human use are suffering from habitat degradation and the introduction of non-native species. Native estuarine species, like the U.S. west coast Olympia oysters, Ostrea lurida, have simultaneously declined. Researchers are investigating the best way to restore O. lurida to stabilize estuarine shorelines and promote community diversity, but they currently co-exist with the globally invasive non-native species, Crassostrea gigas. Multiple studies elsewhere have compared the communities of organisms that recruit to C. gigas shells compared to native oysters, but with mixed results. No studies have compared community diversity on C. gigas versus O. lurida shells. I am investigating whether sessile species richness differs between O. lurida and C. gigas shells on replicate baycrete tiles of various compositions and textures in San Diego at 0 and +0.6 m MLLW. I measured the texture of each oyster shell on the upper-side and underside of baycrete tiles, then counted and identified the sessile species on the top shell valve of each oyster. At 0 m MLLW, O. lurida supported a higher species richness than C. gigas on the undersides of tiles across all treatments, but C. gigas supported a higher species abundance than O. lurida on the upper-side of tiles at 0 m MLLW, and both sides of the tile at +0.6 m MLLW across all treatments. Reef balls should be deployed at 0 m MLLW and maximize the habitat available on the underside regardless of baycrete composition and texture.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Recruitment of sessile species to native versus non-native oyster shells in San Diego Bay, CA

80

Estuaries modified by human use are suffering from habitat degradation and the introduction of non-native species. Native estuarine species, like the U.S. west coast Olympia oysters, Ostrea lurida, have simultaneously declined. Researchers are investigating the best way to restore O. lurida to stabilize estuarine shorelines and promote community diversity, but they currently co-exist with the globally invasive non-native species, Crassostrea gigas. Multiple studies elsewhere have compared the communities of organisms that recruit to C. gigas shells compared to native oysters, but with mixed results. No studies have compared community diversity on C. gigas versus O. lurida shells. I am investigating whether sessile species richness differs between O. lurida and C. gigas shells on replicate baycrete tiles of various compositions and textures in San Diego at 0 and +0.6 m MLLW. I measured the texture of each oyster shell on the upper-side and underside of baycrete tiles, then counted and identified the sessile species on the top shell valve of each oyster. At 0 m MLLW, O. lurida supported a higher species richness than C. gigas on the undersides of tiles across all treatments, but C. gigas supported a higher species abundance than O. lurida on the upper-side of tiles at 0 m MLLW, and both sides of the tile at +0.6 m MLLW across all treatments. Reef balls should be deployed at 0 m MLLW and maximize the habitat available on the underside regardless of baycrete composition and texture.