Presentation Title

She asked for it, and he didn't mean to: Reproductive strategies predict opinions toward sexual violence

Faculty Mentor

Aaron T Goetz

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

10

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Humans are a highly social species; we show an intense interest in the activities of others regardless of the consequence of a conspecific's behavior. We often justify this curiosity and condemnation of behavior through the concept of “morality.” The traditional model of moralistic attitudes (e.g., attitudes about abortion, casual sex, drug use) proposes that these attitudes are an output of political orientation and religiosity. However, researchers have recently demonstrated that several attitudes are being mediated by an individual’s attitudes towards casual sex—possibly serving as a mechanism to prevent interference for reproductive strategies (Weeden, Cohen, & Kenrick, 2008; Kurzban, Dukes, & Weeden, 2010). We propose that individual differences in acceptance of rape myths are being driven by attitudes towards casual sex. Specifically, we examine the relationship between (1) abstract political ideology, (2) attitudes towards casual sex, and (3) rape myth acceptance. Our first hypothesis states that individuals who are less accepting of third-party casual sex will be more likely to score higher on the IRMA scale. Hypothesis one was supported. RMA was negatively correlated with attitudes toward third-party casual sex, such that the less accepting of third-party casual sex, the more accepting of rape myths a person was, r(242)=-.33,p<.001. Our second hypothesis states that attitudes towards third-party casual sex will be a statistical, unique predictor of RMA beyond religiosity and political orientation. Our second hypothesis was supported; third party casual sex, religiosity, and political orientation statistically predicts 27.7% of the variance in RMA, F(3,251)= 32.03, p<.001. Third-party casual sex was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = -0.18, p < .05). Religiosity was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = -0.18, p < .01), and political orientation was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = 0.49, p < .01).

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

She asked for it, and he didn't mean to: Reproductive strategies predict opinions toward sexual violence

10

Humans are a highly social species; we show an intense interest in the activities of others regardless of the consequence of a conspecific's behavior. We often justify this curiosity and condemnation of behavior through the concept of “morality.” The traditional model of moralistic attitudes (e.g., attitudes about abortion, casual sex, drug use) proposes that these attitudes are an output of political orientation and religiosity. However, researchers have recently demonstrated that several attitudes are being mediated by an individual’s attitudes towards casual sex—possibly serving as a mechanism to prevent interference for reproductive strategies (Weeden, Cohen, & Kenrick, 2008; Kurzban, Dukes, & Weeden, 2010). We propose that individual differences in acceptance of rape myths are being driven by attitudes towards casual sex. Specifically, we examine the relationship between (1) abstract political ideology, (2) attitudes towards casual sex, and (3) rape myth acceptance. Our first hypothesis states that individuals who are less accepting of third-party casual sex will be more likely to score higher on the IRMA scale. Hypothesis one was supported. RMA was negatively correlated with attitudes toward third-party casual sex, such that the less accepting of third-party casual sex, the more accepting of rape myths a person was, r(242)=-.33,p<.001. Our second hypothesis states that attitudes towards third-party casual sex will be a statistical, unique predictor of RMA beyond religiosity and political orientation. Our second hypothesis was supported; third party casual sex, religiosity, and political orientation statistically predicts 27.7% of the variance in RMA, F(3,251)= 32.03, p<.001. Third-party casual sex was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = -0.18, p < .05). Religiosity was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = -0.18, p < .01), and political orientation was a unique predictor of RMA, (β = 0.49, p < .01).