Presentation Title

The Effect of Gibberellic Acid on Herbivory in Weedy and Native Radish

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jeffrey Conner

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

104

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Organisms have limited resources to allocate to competing needs such as growth, reproduction, and defense against enemies. The growth-defense trade-off hypothesis suggests that faster flowering plants allocate less to defense against herbivores and pathogens compared to slower-flowering plants. Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is native only to the Mediterranean but is a serious weed in agricultural fields across the globe. Prior research has shown that weedy radish flowers faster than native radish, and this rapid flowering may be caused by higher levels of gibberellic acid (GA), a plant growth hormone, in weedy compared to native radish. The application of GA to native radish resulted in the natives flowering faster but not as fast as weedy radish; however, GA did not affect weedy radish. These results combined with the trade-off hypothesis suggests that native radish receiving the GA treatment should be more susceptible to herbivores due to their faster flowering. We are measuring leaf area removed by herbivory for both the native and weedy radish, with and without the addition of exogenous GA. We predict that native plants treated with GA treatment will suffer more herbivory and flower faster than native controls. We expect GA to have no effect on the weedy radish, with both treatments receiving the highest herbivory due to their rapid flowering. A better understanding of weed allocation for growth and defense in native and weedy radish could improve weed control in agricultural fields.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Gibberellic Acid on Herbivory in Weedy and Native Radish

104

Organisms have limited resources to allocate to competing needs such as growth, reproduction, and defense against enemies. The growth-defense trade-off hypothesis suggests that faster flowering plants allocate less to defense against herbivores and pathogens compared to slower-flowering plants. Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is native only to the Mediterranean but is a serious weed in agricultural fields across the globe. Prior research has shown that weedy radish flowers faster than native radish, and this rapid flowering may be caused by higher levels of gibberellic acid (GA), a plant growth hormone, in weedy compared to native radish. The application of GA to native radish resulted in the natives flowering faster but not as fast as weedy radish; however, GA did not affect weedy radish. These results combined with the trade-off hypothesis suggests that native radish receiving the GA treatment should be more susceptible to herbivores due to their faster flowering. We are measuring leaf area removed by herbivory for both the native and weedy radish, with and without the addition of exogenous GA. We predict that native plants treated with GA treatment will suffer more herbivory and flower faster than native controls. We expect GA to have no effect on the weedy radish, with both treatments receiving the highest herbivory due to their rapid flowering. A better understanding of weed allocation for growth and defense in native and weedy radish could improve weed control in agricultural fields.