Presentation Title

Viability, Growth and Reproduction of Heligmosomoides bakeri During a Secondary Infection of a Host Treated with Rapamycin

Faculty Mentor

Deborah Kristan

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

106

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

The life history traits of parasites are dependent on the host environment and host immune response. Heligmosomoides bakeri, is an intestinal nematode parasite that infects laboratory mice (Mus musculus). This investigation used rapamycin, an immunosuppressant drug, in the diet of the host. Rapamycin is currently being considered as an over -the -counter drug to slow biological aging. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if inhibition of the host immune system by rapamycin had a significant effect on parasite life history traits during a secondary infection. Mice were fed either a rapamycin diet or control diet for two months. Mice were then infected with H. bakeri, drug cleared of the primary infection, then re-infected with a secondary H. bakeri infection. Starting eight days after the secondary infection fecal egg counts were done daily to determine worm reproduction in vivo. Eighteen days after the secondary infection the mice are euthanized and worms were removed, sexed and counted. Length of ten female and ten male worms from each mouse were then measured, and 10 females were cultured to measure ex vivo reproduction. After 24 hours of incubation in culture media of female worms, egg output and worm motility (an index of viability) were measured. The results of this investigation provide important information about potential over-the-counter use of rapamycin in humans to slow biological aging and how expected changes in immune function may affect susceptibility to parasite infection.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Viability, Growth and Reproduction of Heligmosomoides bakeri During a Secondary Infection of a Host Treated with Rapamycin

106

The life history traits of parasites are dependent on the host environment and host immune response. Heligmosomoides bakeri, is an intestinal nematode parasite that infects laboratory mice (Mus musculus). This investigation used rapamycin, an immunosuppressant drug, in the diet of the host. Rapamycin is currently being considered as an over -the -counter drug to slow biological aging. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if inhibition of the host immune system by rapamycin had a significant effect on parasite life history traits during a secondary infection. Mice were fed either a rapamycin diet or control diet for two months. Mice were then infected with H. bakeri, drug cleared of the primary infection, then re-infected with a secondary H. bakeri infection. Starting eight days after the secondary infection fecal egg counts were done daily to determine worm reproduction in vivo. Eighteen days after the secondary infection the mice are euthanized and worms were removed, sexed and counted. Length of ten female and ten male worms from each mouse were then measured, and 10 females were cultured to measure ex vivo reproduction. After 24 hours of incubation in culture media of female worms, egg output and worm motility (an index of viability) were measured. The results of this investigation provide important information about potential over-the-counter use of rapamycin in humans to slow biological aging and how expected changes in immune function may affect susceptibility to parasite infection.