Presentation Title

The Effect of Familism on Mexican-American College Students

Faculty Mentor

Noriko Toyokawa

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

140

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

education

Abstract

Abstract

Backgrounds: Familism is a traditional Latino Culture comprises of family obligation, family as referents, and mutual support among family members (Knight et al., 2010). In the literature, the effect of familism on Mexican American college students’ career outcomes are not always consistent.

Goals: The goals of the current study were to examine the effect of familism on Mexican American students’ internal career locus of control and the effect of three components of familism on students’ internal career locus of control.

Method: The data collected through an online survey. Participants included 278 Mexican American students who were enrolled in a 4-year university at the time of the online survey (Mage=20.80, SD=2.80).

Internal career locus of control was assessed by 5-items by 6-point Likert type from 1=Strongly disagree to 6=Strongly agree (Millar & Shevlin, 2007). Familism was assessed by the three subcomponents of familism from the Mexican American Cultural Value Scale (Knight et al., 2010). Participants responded by 5-Likert type scale ranging from 1=very uncharacteristic to 5=very characteristic.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Familism on Mexican-American College Students

140

Abstract

Backgrounds: Familism is a traditional Latino Culture comprises of family obligation, family as referents, and mutual support among family members (Knight et al., 2010). In the literature, the effect of familism on Mexican American college students’ career outcomes are not always consistent.

Goals: The goals of the current study were to examine the effect of familism on Mexican American students’ internal career locus of control and the effect of three components of familism on students’ internal career locus of control.

Method: The data collected through an online survey. Participants included 278 Mexican American students who were enrolled in a 4-year university at the time of the online survey (Mage=20.80, SD=2.80).

Internal career locus of control was assessed by 5-items by 6-point Likert type from 1=Strongly disagree to 6=Strongly agree (Millar & Shevlin, 2007). Familism was assessed by the three subcomponents of familism from the Mexican American Cultural Value Scale (Knight et al., 2010). Participants responded by 5-Likert type scale ranging from 1=very uncharacteristic to 5=very characteristic.