Presentation Title

Nonthermal Plasma Nanoparticle Synthesis of Aluminum for Battery Applications

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lorenzo Mangolini

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

158

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Nanoscale crystalline metal particles have proven exceedingly difficult to synthesize by any means despite their wide variety of potential uses, with applications ranging from explosives to battery technologies. To accomplish this we have employed non-thermal plasma in a variety of custom-built reactors to synthesize pure nanoparticles. Employing a temperature-controlled inert gas container to vary the vapor pressure of the solid AlCl3 precursor, which leads directly into a plasma reactor with hydrogen added for plasma quenching has proven to be an effective method of particle production. This poster presents a subsequent investigation of the effect of three primary variables for this method of particle synthesis: reactor/electrode geometry, reactor pressure, and amount of input hydrogen. Properties of the produced material are then characterized by employing Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques in addition to Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Structure, crystallinity, particle shape, and particle size are then analyzed, permitting the classification of the yield in addition to the observation of trends for the three variables in question. With regards to the reactor/electrode geometry, excessive film growth induced electrical shorting between ground and electrode in standard ring-electrode configurations. This can be resolved by the use of a live internal electrode in coax configurations. Additionally all but the grounded-center live-ring configurations produced near identical particles at tested conditions. Reactor pressure has proven to be directly related to particle crystallinity/composition as pressures below 5 torr fail to provide an XRD signal. Finally, the amount of hydrogen directly impacts the decomposition of the precursor, with too much quenching the plasma in the place of the precursor vapors, and too little being insufficient to remove the excess chlorine. The seemingly optimal region being around 3-5 sccm with increased hydrogen content relating to smaller particle size.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Nonthermal Plasma Nanoparticle Synthesis of Aluminum for Battery Applications

158

Nanoscale crystalline metal particles have proven exceedingly difficult to synthesize by any means despite their wide variety of potential uses, with applications ranging from explosives to battery technologies. To accomplish this we have employed non-thermal plasma in a variety of custom-built reactors to synthesize pure nanoparticles. Employing a temperature-controlled inert gas container to vary the vapor pressure of the solid AlCl3 precursor, which leads directly into a plasma reactor with hydrogen added for plasma quenching has proven to be an effective method of particle production. This poster presents a subsequent investigation of the effect of three primary variables for this method of particle synthesis: reactor/electrode geometry, reactor pressure, and amount of input hydrogen. Properties of the produced material are then characterized by employing Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques in addition to Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Structure, crystallinity, particle shape, and particle size are then analyzed, permitting the classification of the yield in addition to the observation of trends for the three variables in question. With regards to the reactor/electrode geometry, excessive film growth induced electrical shorting between ground and electrode in standard ring-electrode configurations. This can be resolved by the use of a live internal electrode in coax configurations. Additionally all but the grounded-center live-ring configurations produced near identical particles at tested conditions. Reactor pressure has proven to be directly related to particle crystallinity/composition as pressures below 5 torr fail to provide an XRD signal. Finally, the amount of hydrogen directly impacts the decomposition of the precursor, with too much quenching the plasma in the place of the precursor vapors, and too little being insufficient to remove the excess chlorine. The seemingly optimal region being around 3-5 sccm with increased hydrogen content relating to smaller particle size.