Presentation Title

How Campus Identity, Campus Satisfaction, and Personality Traits Relate to Academic Achievement

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Coons

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

16

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Academic success in college is influenced by a plethora of factors, many that are predisposed and out of the student’s control, such as personality traits (Komarraju, Karau, & Schmeck, 2008). However, there are other factors that students can engage in that relate to academic success such as campus satisfaction and campus identity (Jackson, Miller, Frew, Gilbreath, & Dillman, 2011). The current study examined how personality traits, campus satisfaction, and campus identity relate to students’ academic success (assessed via current GPA). Students from two introductory psychology classes (144 participants; 68.8% female with a mean age of 18.95) completed the study. The results of correlational analyses indicated that personality traits and campus satisfaction do have a relationship with academic achievement (GPA). Specifically, conscientiousness (r(142) = .314, p < .001), agreeableness (r(142) = .227, p = .006), and campus satisfaction (r(142) = .394 , p < .001) were positively related to GPA while neuroticism was negatively related to GPA (r(142) = -.171, p = .04). Additionally, although campus identity does have a relationship with personality traits and campus satisfaction it does not relate to overall GPA (r(147) = .068, p = .417 ). Implications of this study suggest that targeted intervention methods towards improving conscientiousness and agreeableness early on during the transition to college could be beneficial for students’ overall academic success via an indirect pathway through campus identity. Data collection is ongoing to examine whether campus identity or campus satisfaction mediate the relationship between personality traits and GPA.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

How Campus Identity, Campus Satisfaction, and Personality Traits Relate to Academic Achievement

16

Academic success in college is influenced by a plethora of factors, many that are predisposed and out of the student’s control, such as personality traits (Komarraju, Karau, & Schmeck, 2008). However, there are other factors that students can engage in that relate to academic success such as campus satisfaction and campus identity (Jackson, Miller, Frew, Gilbreath, & Dillman, 2011). The current study examined how personality traits, campus satisfaction, and campus identity relate to students’ academic success (assessed via current GPA). Students from two introductory psychology classes (144 participants; 68.8% female with a mean age of 18.95) completed the study. The results of correlational analyses indicated that personality traits and campus satisfaction do have a relationship with academic achievement (GPA). Specifically, conscientiousness (r(142) = .314, p < .001), agreeableness (r(142) = .227, p = .006), and campus satisfaction (r(142) = .394 , p < .001) were positively related to GPA while neuroticism was negatively related to GPA (r(142) = -.171, p = .04). Additionally, although campus identity does have a relationship with personality traits and campus satisfaction it does not relate to overall GPA (r(147) = .068, p = .417 ). Implications of this study suggest that targeted intervention methods towards improving conscientiousness and agreeableness early on during the transition to college could be beneficial for students’ overall academic success via an indirect pathway through campus identity. Data collection is ongoing to examine whether campus identity or campus satisfaction mediate the relationship between personality traits and GPA.