Presentation Title

Continuous Carbon Fiber Printing: An Advance in Biomedical-grade 3D Printing

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Siheng Su

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

170

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Continuous Carbon Fiber Printing: An Advance in Biomedical-grade 3D Printing

Nicholas Sewani, Tarun Sarvaiya, Dr. Siheng Su

Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University Fullerton

Fullerton, CA 92831, USA

The implementation of 3D printing has brought many improvements to manufacturing processes. If 3D printing can be used to provide quality composite materials, it may serve as a useful resource to the biomedical industry.

Metals have been widely used as orthopedic implants since the 19th century as temporary or permanent orthopedic implants due to their promising properties, such as high strength, ease of manufacturing and low cost. However, the high elastic modulus of metals would also cause stress shielding and detrimental periprosthetic bone remodeling. Moreover, generation of wear debris, low fatigue life, and high radiodensity of metal implants prompt the development of alternative implant materials. Thus, fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) have gained numerous attentions as orthopedic implants recently. However, the current methods (solution casting or hot pressing) to produce FRP cause poor fiber impregnation, resulting in weak bonding in the interfaces between fibers and polymer matrix, which cannot guarantee a homogeneous distribution and control the alignment of fibers in the polymer matrix, failing to create effective reinforcement.

Therefore, a 3D printed FRP incorporated with continuous carbon fiber using fused deposition modeling (FDM) is proposed to control the composition, distribution and alignment of carbon fiber (CF) in the polymer matrix, to develop a ‘light’ and ‘strong’ FRP for orthopedic implants. For this purpose, an Anet A8 3D printer will be modified to make it capable of extruding the polylactic acid (PLA) and CF simultaneously. Also, an algorithm will be developed to modify the “G-Code” to optimize the printing path to improve the processing efficiency. Successful completion of the project will result in the development of 3D printing techniques for high-performance composite material manufacturing.

orthopedic implants

metals

stress

fatigue

fiber reinforced polymers (FRP)

fused deposition modeling (FDM)

polyactic acid (PLA)

carbon fiber (CF)

algorithm

composite material manufacturing

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Continuous Carbon Fiber Printing: An Advance in Biomedical-grade 3D Printing

170

Continuous Carbon Fiber Printing: An Advance in Biomedical-grade 3D Printing

Nicholas Sewani, Tarun Sarvaiya, Dr. Siheng Su

Department of Mechanical Engineering, California State University Fullerton

Fullerton, CA 92831, USA

The implementation of 3D printing has brought many improvements to manufacturing processes. If 3D printing can be used to provide quality composite materials, it may serve as a useful resource to the biomedical industry.

Metals have been widely used as orthopedic implants since the 19th century as temporary or permanent orthopedic implants due to their promising properties, such as high strength, ease of manufacturing and low cost. However, the high elastic modulus of metals would also cause stress shielding and detrimental periprosthetic bone remodeling. Moreover, generation of wear debris, low fatigue life, and high radiodensity of metal implants prompt the development of alternative implant materials. Thus, fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) have gained numerous attentions as orthopedic implants recently. However, the current methods (solution casting or hot pressing) to produce FRP cause poor fiber impregnation, resulting in weak bonding in the interfaces between fibers and polymer matrix, which cannot guarantee a homogeneous distribution and control the alignment of fibers in the polymer matrix, failing to create effective reinforcement.

Therefore, a 3D printed FRP incorporated with continuous carbon fiber using fused deposition modeling (FDM) is proposed to control the composition, distribution and alignment of carbon fiber (CF) in the polymer matrix, to develop a ‘light’ and ‘strong’ FRP for orthopedic implants. For this purpose, an Anet A8 3D printer will be modified to make it capable of extruding the polylactic acid (PLA) and CF simultaneously. Also, an algorithm will be developed to modify the “G-Code” to optimize the printing path to improve the processing efficiency. Successful completion of the project will result in the development of 3D printing techniques for high-performance composite material manufacturing.

orthopedic implants

metals

stress

fatigue

fiber reinforced polymers (FRP)

fused deposition modeling (FDM)

polyactic acid (PLA)

carbon fiber (CF)

algorithm

composite material manufacturing