Presentation Title

Design of Dip Coating Apparatus for Thermite Deposition Applications

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Joseph Kalman

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

176

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Design of Dip Coating Apparatus for Thermite Deposition Applications

A simple dip-coating method which has been used to coat substrates with thermite that is suspended in a solution. The deposition of thermite films onto a substrate is dependent on the dipping and withdrawal rate of the substrate. Here we present the results of our design and construction of a dip-coating machine to carry out automatic dip coating. The machine will consist of a motor, a power screw, a linearly translating plate, and a frame. To design and build this machine, we researched motors that would provide adequate torque and accurate speeds that would meet our requirements. These requirements included obtaining an acceptable speed range with enough torque produced by the motor for the experiment to be of consideration. The weight being dipped was assumed to be around 200 grams and that was another factor considered for motor options as such will affect the torque. The maximum torque required is 0.01 N-m and the speed for the experiment is found to be from 1 mm/s - 10 m/s. A stepper motor was then chosen to be the type of motor to execute the experiment, although, stepper motors do nott operate very fast if it is directly connected and will then be equipped with a transmission gearing system in the future to account for speed losses. Since the motor will be connected to a gearing system it will need more torque due to losses from the gearing. The motor selected was a NEMA 34Y108S-LW8 from Anaheim Automation, which can give enough torque to lift and lower our substrate for the considered dipping and withdrawal rates. It will be driven with a DM860T stepper driver and programmed with an Arduino using buttons and a solid state relay that is connected to a high speed camera. Drawings were created in Solidworks and the prototype was machined using aluminum and steel scrap metal on a lathe and mill. The motor machine frame has been built, and the machine motor’s programming is being worked on currently. The motor will be calibrated using a high speed camera, and once that is done the machine can begin dip coat testing.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Design of Dip Coating Apparatus for Thermite Deposition Applications

176

Design of Dip Coating Apparatus for Thermite Deposition Applications

A simple dip-coating method which has been used to coat substrates with thermite that is suspended in a solution. The deposition of thermite films onto a substrate is dependent on the dipping and withdrawal rate of the substrate. Here we present the results of our design and construction of a dip-coating machine to carry out automatic dip coating. The machine will consist of a motor, a power screw, a linearly translating plate, and a frame. To design and build this machine, we researched motors that would provide adequate torque and accurate speeds that would meet our requirements. These requirements included obtaining an acceptable speed range with enough torque produced by the motor for the experiment to be of consideration. The weight being dipped was assumed to be around 200 grams and that was another factor considered for motor options as such will affect the torque. The maximum torque required is 0.01 N-m and the speed for the experiment is found to be from 1 mm/s - 10 m/s. A stepper motor was then chosen to be the type of motor to execute the experiment, although, stepper motors do nott operate very fast if it is directly connected and will then be equipped with a transmission gearing system in the future to account for speed losses. Since the motor will be connected to a gearing system it will need more torque due to losses from the gearing. The motor selected was a NEMA 34Y108S-LW8 from Anaheim Automation, which can give enough torque to lift and lower our substrate for the considered dipping and withdrawal rates. It will be driven with a DM860T stepper driver and programmed with an Arduino using buttons and a solid state relay that is connected to a high speed camera. Drawings were created in Solidworks and the prototype was machined using aluminum and steel scrap metal on a lathe and mill. The motor machine frame has been built, and the machine motor’s programming is being worked on currently. The motor will be calibrated using a high speed camera, and once that is done the machine can begin dip coat testing.