Presentation Title

Similar Perceptual Responses to REHIT in Young Men and Women

Faculty Mentor

Todd Astorino

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

192

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Background: Reduced exertion high intensity interval training (REHIT) is a low-volume approach to sprint interval exercise (SIE) that involves 2-3 supramaximal bouts within a 10 minute session of exercise. Widespread implementation of supramaximal bouts of interval training has been questioned due to potential aversive responses, as represented by negative affective valence, which are consequent with substantial fatigue, hyperventilation, and overall feelings of discomfort. REHIT has a minimal exercise volume which may attenuate reductions in affective valence and improve long-term adherence to physical activity. It is apparent that differences in muscle mass, fiber type, and substrate utilization exist between men and women that may alter physiological responses which in turn may elicit differences in affective valence. Aim: To examine changes in affective valence between young men and women performing REHIT. Methods: Eighty four participants (43 men and 41 women, age = 24 ± 1.03 yr and 22 ± 0.47 yr, respectively, VO2max = 39.8 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min in men vs. 34.1 ± 6.2 mL/kg/min in women) completed REHIT consisting of two 20 s “all-out” sprints on the cycle ergometer at resistance equal to 5 % body mass. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affective valence, and physical activity enjoyment (PACES) were determined. Results: Both men and women revealed similar changes in RPE (p=0.60) and affective valence (p=0.96), despite men attaining significantly higher peak and mean power output in response to REHIT. Enjoyment was higher in men compared to women (97.3 ± 16.9 in men vs. 86.7 ± 20.9 in women, p = 0.015). Conclusion: The low-volume structure of REHIT may diminish the role of gender and effects of underlying physiological differences between young men and women on the resultant affective valence. It is possible that the higher fitness level in men led to higher post-exercise enjoyment scores.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Similar Perceptual Responses to REHIT in Young Men and Women

192

Background: Reduced exertion high intensity interval training (REHIT) is a low-volume approach to sprint interval exercise (SIE) that involves 2-3 supramaximal bouts within a 10 minute session of exercise. Widespread implementation of supramaximal bouts of interval training has been questioned due to potential aversive responses, as represented by negative affective valence, which are consequent with substantial fatigue, hyperventilation, and overall feelings of discomfort. REHIT has a minimal exercise volume which may attenuate reductions in affective valence and improve long-term adherence to physical activity. It is apparent that differences in muscle mass, fiber type, and substrate utilization exist between men and women that may alter physiological responses which in turn may elicit differences in affective valence. Aim: To examine changes in affective valence between young men and women performing REHIT. Methods: Eighty four participants (43 men and 41 women, age = 24 ± 1.03 yr and 22 ± 0.47 yr, respectively, VO2max = 39.8 ± 6.5 mL/kg/min in men vs. 34.1 ± 6.2 mL/kg/min in women) completed REHIT consisting of two 20 s “all-out” sprints on the cycle ergometer at resistance equal to 5 % body mass. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE), affective valence, and physical activity enjoyment (PACES) were determined. Results: Both men and women revealed similar changes in RPE (p=0.60) and affective valence (p=0.96), despite men attaining significantly higher peak and mean power output in response to REHIT. Enjoyment was higher in men compared to women (97.3 ± 16.9 in men vs. 86.7 ± 20.9 in women, p = 0.015). Conclusion: The low-volume structure of REHIT may diminish the role of gender and effects of underlying physiological differences between young men and women on the resultant affective valence. It is possible that the higher fitness level in men led to higher post-exercise enjoyment scores.