Presentation Title

Shoulder, hip, and trunk kinematics vary with posture during Stand Up Paddle boarding

Faculty Mentor

Jamie Hibbert

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

194

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

health_nutrition_clinical_science

Abstract

Introduction: Paddle boarding is becoming an increasingly popular sport, but there is limited research regarding proper biomechanics during paddle boarding. The purpose of this study is to examine the kinematics of paddle boarding in two commonly adopted postures; standing and kneeling. We hypothesized that there will be greater trunk and hip excursion in a standing posture and greater shoulder excursion during kneeling.

Methods: 5 participants, 2 males and 3 females (21.6 ± 2.07 years) were fitted with a standard 32 marker set for 3D motion capture. Participants performed 6 paddling trials in both kneeling and standing postures. Kinematic data were evaluated for differences in trunk and shoulder excursion. An a priori alpha level was set at α=0.05. All statistical analyses were conducted using paired t-tests in Microsoft Excel.

Results: There was significantly more shoulder movement observed on the contralateral side during kneeling as compared to standing on while paddling on both RS (p=0.022) and LS (p=0.028). A similar pattern emerged at the hips with significantly more movement observed at the ipsilateral hip during standing as compared to kneeling on both the RS (p=0.036) and LS (p=0.007). Greater excursion was observed at the right hip during LS paddling in standing compared to kneeling (p=0.0249). The only significant difference in trunk movement was noted during RS paddling during standing as compared to kneeling (p=0.041).

Discussion: These data agree with our initial hypothesis that there would be greater shoulder joint movement while padding in the kneeling posture, greater hip excursion in the standing posture, but the movement at the trunk was only greater in standing during RS paddling. Future studies should compare the upper limb kinematics of paddle boarders who have pain with the kinematics of healthy controls. This information may contribute to better understanding optimal paddling kinematics.

Keywords: paddle boarding, biomechanics, kinematics, upper limb, trunk

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Shoulder, hip, and trunk kinematics vary with posture during Stand Up Paddle boarding

194

Introduction: Paddle boarding is becoming an increasingly popular sport, but there is limited research regarding proper biomechanics during paddle boarding. The purpose of this study is to examine the kinematics of paddle boarding in two commonly adopted postures; standing and kneeling. We hypothesized that there will be greater trunk and hip excursion in a standing posture and greater shoulder excursion during kneeling.

Methods: 5 participants, 2 males and 3 females (21.6 ± 2.07 years) were fitted with a standard 32 marker set for 3D motion capture. Participants performed 6 paddling trials in both kneeling and standing postures. Kinematic data were evaluated for differences in trunk and shoulder excursion. An a priori alpha level was set at α=0.05. All statistical analyses were conducted using paired t-tests in Microsoft Excel.

Results: There was significantly more shoulder movement observed on the contralateral side during kneeling as compared to standing on while paddling on both RS (p=0.022) and LS (p=0.028). A similar pattern emerged at the hips with significantly more movement observed at the ipsilateral hip during standing as compared to kneeling on both the RS (p=0.036) and LS (p=0.007). Greater excursion was observed at the right hip during LS paddling in standing compared to kneeling (p=0.0249). The only significant difference in trunk movement was noted during RS paddling during standing as compared to kneeling (p=0.041).

Discussion: These data agree with our initial hypothesis that there would be greater shoulder joint movement while padding in the kneeling posture, greater hip excursion in the standing posture, but the movement at the trunk was only greater in standing during RS paddling. Future studies should compare the upper limb kinematics of paddle boarders who have pain with the kinematics of healthy controls. This information may contribute to better understanding optimal paddling kinematics.

Keywords: paddle boarding, biomechanics, kinematics, upper limb, trunk