Presentation Title

Why Us? - A historical look into U.S. policy leading up to the September 11th terrorist attacks

Faculty Mentor

Ali Olomi

Start Date

23-11-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

196

Session

poster 4

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

humanities_letters

Abstract

Through a detailed analysis of U.S. policy in the area commonly known as the Middle East, my research attempts to consolidate the discrepancy between the considerably strong relationship between the United States and most Middle Eastern states in the late 19th and early 20th century, and the events leading up to September 11, 2001, when the United States was subject to the most devastating terrorist attack in modern history. Breaking from its long history of isolationism, the beginning of U.S. involvement in the Middle East can be traced to three main developments. First, the discovery of oil in Saudi Arabia prompted an economic relationship between the two nations that continues today. Second, the Cold War dramatically shaped American international policy, from the Truman Doctrine to more political and military actions abroad. Finally, the U.S. continued support of the state of Israel remains to this day a major point of backlash against the United States from many Middle Eastern states. My research project uses these three points to understand and contextualize the surge of Middle Eastern resentment that culminated in Al Qaeda’s infamous attacks. Furthermore, I consider the consequences of this isolated event – both ideologically and politically – and how these developments at the turn of the century continue to shape the world today.

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Nov 23rd, 10:45 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

Why Us? - A historical look into U.S. policy leading up to the September 11th terrorist attacks

196

Through a detailed analysis of U.S. policy in the area commonly known as the Middle East, my research attempts to consolidate the discrepancy between the considerably strong relationship between the United States and most Middle Eastern states in the late 19th and early 20th century, and the events leading up to September 11, 2001, when the United States was subject to the most devastating terrorist attack in modern history. Breaking from its long history of isolationism, the beginning of U.S. involvement in the Middle East can be traced to three main developments. First, the discovery of oil in Saudi Arabia prompted an economic relationship between the two nations that continues today. Second, the Cold War dramatically shaped American international policy, from the Truman Doctrine to more political and military actions abroad. Finally, the U.S. continued support of the state of Israel remains to this day a major point of backlash against the United States from many Middle Eastern states. My research project uses these three points to understand and contextualize the surge of Middle Eastern resentment that culminated in Al Qaeda’s infamous attacks. Furthermore, I consider the consequences of this isolated event – both ideologically and politically – and how these developments at the turn of the century continue to shape the world today.