Presentation Title

3D Praxinoscope

Presenter Information

Jonathan HenryFollow

Faculty Mentor

Lucy HG Solomon

Start Date

23-11-2019 11:15 AM

End Date

23-11-2019 11:30 AM

Location

Arts 111

Session

oral 2

Type of Presentation

Visual and Performing Arts

Subject Area

creative_arts_design

Abstract

Jonathan Henry, California State University San Marcos

3D Praxinoscope

Wood, metal, mirrors, photographs

The foundation for 3D Praxinoscope is time and space, two concepts in which I’ve always had an interest. I am heavily influenced by artists and showmen, including the Lumière brothers, Georges Méliès, Buffalo Bill, and Harry Houdini. They have amazed their audiences with performances via the new medium of cinema, live performance, and magic/illusion. I knew that by building a praxinoscope with the added layer of 3D, I, too, could create a spectacle while still incorporating themes of time and space, mirrors and reflections, and magic and illusion.

“3D Praxinoscope” takes two eras of the past and joins them in the present: the 1800s was the century during which Charles Wheatstone discovered 3D anaglyph stereoscopy (1838), Émile Reynaud invented the praxinoscope (1877), and Eadweard Muybridge photographed his “Horse in Motion” (1878). Second, in the 1900s, Harry K. Fairfall directed and produced The Power of Love (1922), the first 3D feature film. The project’s development consisted of researching praxinoscopes, zoetropes, and other pre-cinema moving picture devices. This inadvertently led to further research into stereoscopics, the process of creating the illusion of three-dimensional imagery, which led to the incorporation of 3D photographs. I constructed the 3D Praxinoscope out of wood as a pentadecagon, a shape of 15 sides to accommodate the 15 images of Muybridge’s “Horse in Motion.” Each of those frames were made into 3D anaglyphs and affixed to the inside of the praxinoscope. When spun clockwise, the horse appears to be moving forward through time.

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Nov 23rd, 11:15 AM Nov 23rd, 11:30 AM

3D Praxinoscope

Arts 111

Jonathan Henry, California State University San Marcos

3D Praxinoscope

Wood, metal, mirrors, photographs

The foundation for 3D Praxinoscope is time and space, two concepts in which I’ve always had an interest. I am heavily influenced by artists and showmen, including the Lumière brothers, Georges Méliès, Buffalo Bill, and Harry Houdini. They have amazed their audiences with performances via the new medium of cinema, live performance, and magic/illusion. I knew that by building a praxinoscope with the added layer of 3D, I, too, could create a spectacle while still incorporating themes of time and space, mirrors and reflections, and magic and illusion.

“3D Praxinoscope” takes two eras of the past and joins them in the present: the 1800s was the century during which Charles Wheatstone discovered 3D anaglyph stereoscopy (1838), Émile Reynaud invented the praxinoscope (1877), and Eadweard Muybridge photographed his “Horse in Motion” (1878). Second, in the 1900s, Harry K. Fairfall directed and produced The Power of Love (1922), the first 3D feature film. The project’s development consisted of researching praxinoscopes, zoetropes, and other pre-cinema moving picture devices. This inadvertently led to further research into stereoscopics, the process of creating the illusion of three-dimensional imagery, which led to the incorporation of 3D photographs. I constructed the 3D Praxinoscope out of wood as a pentadecagon, a shape of 15 sides to accommodate the 15 images of Muybridge’s “Horse in Motion.” Each of those frames were made into 3D anaglyphs and affixed to the inside of the praxinoscope. When spun clockwise, the horse appears to be moving forward through time.